CSCI 250 Spring 2012
Discrete Structures
Archived Class
Charles Cusack
Computer Science
Hope College
Main
Schedule
Grading
Gradebook
Homework

Policies
College
    Policies
Advice

Notes
Programs
Tutorials

CSCI 255
MATH 132
Others

Admin

Homework 6

Comments

  • Exercises taken from Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, Seventh Edition unless otherwise noted.
  • You must show all of your work for each problem!
  • Points will be deducted if you do not show all of your work.
  • Each problem is generally worth 10 points. Problems with multiple parts may be assigned more points if there are enough parts or each part is significant enough.
  • The Review Questions are always related to the section that will be discussed on the assignment due date.

Details

SectionProblemsNotes
1.240Look at #41 to see what sort of answer it is looking for.
1.358Briefly describe how you arrived at your answer.
1.432See the solution to #33 for an example of what it is asking for. In particular, for each one you need to:
  1. Specify the domain and define appropriate predicate(s).
  2. Express the statement using your predicate(s) and the appropriate quantifier(s).
  3. Negate the expression and then move the negation as far to the right as you can.
  4. Express the negation in English, phrasing it "nicely".
(This one is worth 20 points)
1.72Be very precise, using the definition of even (In particular, you cannot not say, for instance, that 10x+14y-6z+12 is even. You must use algebra to make it look like 2k for some integer k. Similarly for future problems with either odd or even.). A common mistake on this kind of proof is to write it in such a way that you are essentially assuming the two numbers are the same number without realizing it.
16As with the previous problem, make sure you don't construct a proof that only ends up proving it for m=n.
Review Question12On page 111